KeyVault

Using Managed Identity to Securely Access Azure Resources

Using Managed Identity to Securely Access Azure Resources

Managed Identity (MI) service has been around for a little while now and is becoming a standard for providing applications running in Azure access to other Azure resources. We're going to be taking a look at using MI in a few areas in the future, such as Kubernetes pods, so before we do, I thought it was worth a primer on MI. Managed Service Identity has recently been renamed to Managed Identity.
Exporting Azure App Service Certificates

Exporting Azure App Service Certificates

Azure App Service Certificates provide a convenient way to purchase SSL certificates and assign them to Azure Apps right from within the portal, but one question I see a lot is whether it is possible to use this certificate elsewhere, outside of the app service, particularly if you have purchased a wild-card certificate. The certificate provided by App Service Certificates isn’t anything special, it’s a pretty standard SSL cert, the service just provides a nice easy way to provision it and assign it to your web service.
Secure Credential Access with Azure Batch and KeyVault

Secure Credential Access with Azure Batch and KeyVault

Following on from my post on joining Azure batch pools to a vNet, this leads on to a requirement to access resources on the vNet and this means credentials are needed. Rather than hard-coding these credentials in scripts, we want to obtain these from a secure storage location on demand and this is where Azure KeyVault comes in, providing a secure, encrypted storage location for our credentials. Obviously there is no point putting your admin credentials in KeyVault, then hard-coding credentials to access KeyVault in your script, so the solution is to use a certificate to give your batch VM’s access to KeyVault.