ARM

Azure Resource Manger Snippets for VSCode

Azure Resource Manger Snippets for VSCode

I previously wrote about using VS Code for authoring Azure Resource Manger templates, in particular about using the snippets from the cross platform toolkit to create skeletons for many ARM resources. In this post I documented the manual installation process for these snippets, as there was not a VS Code extension to install these automatically. This is no longer the case, I have recently published a VS Code extension that takes these snippets (with attribution) and packages them up and makes them available in the VS Code marketplace for easy installation and updating.
Completing your automated VM deployments with the DSC VM extension

Completing your automated VM deployments with the DSC VM extension

Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates are a great resource for deploying Azure infrastructure, including virtual machines, in a declarative manner. However, using an ARM template to deploy a VM will only get you as far as having a VM deployed and the operating system installed and running. The next step is to get any applications and supporting software installed on those machines. Of course you can RDP to machine and do this manually, but this breaks down quickly if you have lots of machines or need to regularly deploy VM’s.
Conditions in ARM Templates - The Right Way!

Conditions in ARM Templates - The Right Way!

At this months Build conference there where lot’s of new Azure announcements and in particular lots of new features for Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates. Ryan Jones. PM on ARM templates, did a breakout session talking about all this new functionality which is available now on channel 9. I want to focus on one of the big improvements, at least from perspective, and that is we now have proper conditional logic in ARM templates!
ARM Template Deployments for MYSQL and PostgreSQl

ARM Template Deployments for MYSQL and PostgreSQl

Last week at build Microsoft announced a preview of MYSQL and PostgreSQL databases as a PaaS service running in Azure. Since then, we’ve not yet seen full documentation of the ARM templates required to deploy these, however some example templates did appear on Github a few days ago that provide enough information to begin creating templates that use these two database services. Both databases look to follow the same design, with just a variation in type name.
Using Linked Templates and Conditional Logic in ARM

Using Linked Templates and Conditional Logic in ARM

Microsoft have now added first class conditions to the language so this workaround is no longer required. See this article on how to use this feature.** ARM Templates are a great tool for deploying complex sets of resources in Azure, however as it currently stands there is no concept of an “If” statement in a template. This can make it much more difficult to support the re-use of code and to avoid duplication in your templates, if you have to create a whole new set of templates which are 95% the same but with one section being different.
Protecting Azure Resources with Resource Manager Locks

Protecting Azure Resources with Resource Manager Locks

Resource Manager Locks provide a way for administrators to lock down Azure resources to prevent deletion or changing of a resource. These locks sit outside of the Role Based Access Controls (RBAC) hierarchy and when applied will place the restriction on the resource for all users. These are very useful when you have an important resource in your subscription which users should not be able to delete or change and can help prevent accidental and malicious changes or deletion.
ARM Snippets for VS Code

ARM Snippets for VS Code

Since writing this article I’ve released a VS Code Extension that installs these snippets with a single click, see here.  In my previous post on using VS Code for authoring ARM templates I recommended using an ARM Snippets from the plugin gallery. However since then I have come to realise this plugin is fairly limited in the amount of plugins, and difficult to extend. Given this I would now recommend utilising the set of snippets provided by the Azure Cross Platform Tooling Samples
Authoring ARM Templates in Visual Studio Code

Authoring ARM Templates in Visual Studio Code

If your writing ARM templates for Azure you’ll have found that the amount of tooling available for authoring templates is fairly limited. The default solution seems to be Visual Studio but this can be very heavyweight and resource intensive without gaining any of the real benefits of VS such as debugging. I’ve recently switched over from using Visual Studio to use Visual Studio Code, for a much more light weight experience.
Azure Resource Manager and Multiple NAT Rules

Azure Resource Manager and Multiple NAT Rules

Back in the days of cloud services every VM created got a set of default endpoints that let in traffic for RDP and Remoting on a random port, and if you wanted ingress on other ports you just created more endpoints. In the V2 world cloud services don’t exist, and endpoints are now primary configured as inbound NAT rules on a load balancer, with the default being no NAT rules. This is ultimately a much better and more secure way of doing it, however it did make it a pain when you needed to add one or more NAT rule for each VM in your deployment, especially when you had lots of VM’s.
Azure DSC Extension 2.9.1 Released

Azure DSC Extension 2.9.1 Released

Anyone using the Azure DSC Extension for ARM deployments with the “AutoUpgradeMinorVersion” property set to true will notice that the extension version has gone up to 2.9.1. No official announcement as yet on what is in it, but testing has shown that at a minimum this includes a fix for an issue with server 2016 TP4 OS’s where DSC deployments would fail with the error: ConvertTo-MOFInstance : System.ArgumentException error processing property 'Password' OF TYPE 'MSFT_Credential': Certificate 'AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA' cannot be used for encryption.